February 2013

The Hyannis Town Council will conmtinue public comment on the proposed VoV Landlords, viagra Rentals, and Regulations ordinances during the Town Council Meeting on January
The Hyannis Town Council will conmtinue public comment on the proposed VoV Landlords, viagra Rentals, and Regulations ordinances during the Town Council Meeting on January
This letter was sent to the “Letters to the Editor” column of the Barnstable Patriot and Enterprise.

Date: 11/7/12

While we are disappointed with the recent delay of the Town Council workshop on some proposed ordinance changes and additions which the GHCA Voices of the Village Task Force – Landlords-Rentals & Regulations have been working on, troche  we are busy using this time to continue to reach out to residents and others to educate and answer questions related to the proposals. We’re inviting opponents into the dialogue so we can gain a better understanding of what their issues and concerns are, and hopefully come up with ideas we can adapt to make these work.

I also want to take this opportunity to clarify some facts and misconceptions about the proposals.

The proposal to existing Ch59 Comprehensive Occupancy is only proposing a change in the “legal occupant” age from 22 down to 18. At 22, we have the reality of having 18 -21 year olds enter into a rental agreement, and live in a potential overcrowded house, by which today they are not considered in the number of legal occupants.

Note: The change to remove the number of vehicle clause from Ch59 Comprehensive Occupancy is not our task force proposal, but a legal department directive to remove it from the rental code ordinance.

The proposal to existing Ch170 Rental Code is proposing we change the violation penalty from $100 up to $300; which is the maximum allowed penalty under MA General Law.

The proposal to existing CH133 Noise Ordinance proposes to add the property owner into the penalty assessment if the property is identified as a having a documented chronic noise problem. By including the property owner in the fines, we have closed the gap where transient tenants “wait out” the fine process, and put the burden on property owners to have accountability for who they rent to. If the property owner is in the process of actively addressing the tenant(s), and/or demonstrating they are working with neighbors and police to correct the situation, they will not continue to be assessed. Some opponents say this will infringe on a person’s individual rights, but currently the noise ordinance is already in effect and perpetrators are cited when they violate the ordinance;  however, they are typically thrown out of court or wait it out until their lease ends never to be seen again, and a new tenant comes in and repeats the nuisance cycle. There is no incentive to curtail the repeated documented behavior or for the owner to take responsibility on who they place in our neighborhoods.

The New CH 160 – Chronic Problem Properties proposes to define a coherent method of addressing the adverse effects on the health, safety, welfare, and quality of life of residents arising from properties where illegal activity occurs on a regular basis.  Illegal activity is the key word. Some opponents claim that if their dog knocks over their neighbor’s trash can they will be fined on each occurrence. In reality, unless knocking over your neighbor’s trash can is a criminal activity in their village, the owner would not be fined.  The perception is that it would target specific groups or neighborhoods, and the honest answer is yes, but not negatively; we see this as a support line for the good, law-abiding residents in our Town who live with this activity going on around them every single day, and who want this repeated illegal activity element gone from their neighborhoods. If we can stop one, we’ve helped hundreds. Again, if the property owner is actively working with police and the courts to correct this situation, they would not continue to be assessed.

The New CH 54 – Building Property Maintenance – is to address nuisances, such as deteriorated structures, vacant buildings, etc. which cause and contribute to blight within neighborhoods and commercial areas,  which adversely affect the value of adjacent and surrounding property and impair the health, safety and general welfare of the inhabitants of the town. Despite what some opponents think currently, there is nothing on the books that we can enforce on abandoned or neglected property owners to bring it up to minimal accepted standards.  Boarded up windows and over growth above the windows continue to thrive in our neighborhoods,  devaluing surrounding properties, and creating a potential risk to the neighbors living there. We have a growing list of properties which all the villages have identified, where nothing can be done. Each one has been brought up to our regulatory inspectors, but they were found they are not in violation of current ordinances. Even using the BIRST team is fruitless, as there is no immediate threat to the public because the doors are boarded up, and no one “can access it.”  Tell that to the neighbors who have to keep their kids inside because vermin and other critters living in the over growth must cross through their property to get there; or the risk of having kids or others, find a way inside the premises. We shouldn’t allow owners of neglected or abandoned properties to let their properties deteriorate at the expense of quality of life of others.  One look at the property across from the Elementary School on Bearses Way says it all.

We have worked hard to reach out to all of the villages, understand what their needs are, and we’ll continue to do so. We hope we can work together in addressing the issues or concerns of opponents, and are open to discuss and adapt the proposals with suggestions. If anyone is interested in meeting with us, they can contact me at GreatHyannis@aol.com .

I would like to thank our GHCA Task Force members and the Town Staff who worked diligently on this project for the past 18 months, and everyone else who has been supporting us along the way. I am asking for their continued support and to come to the Dec 6th council meeting to have the Councilors, and the public, hear their voices. Remember, it started with a question… how can we improve Hyannis…take back our village, our neighborhood, and Town? The Voices of The Villages are strong, and we want to do whatever it takes to make all of Barnstable a great place to live.

Sincerely,

Laura Cronin, GHCA VOV LRR Task Force

Hyannis, MA
The Hyannis Town Council will conmtinue public comment on the proposed VoV Landlords, viagra Rentals, and Regulations ordinances during the Town Council Meeting on January
This letter was sent to the “Letters to the Editor” column of the Barnstable Patriot and Enterprise.

Date: 11/7/12

While we are disappointed with the recent delay of the Town Council workshop on some proposed ordinance changes and additions which the GHCA Voices of the Village Task Force – Landlords-Rentals & Regulations have been working on, troche  we are busy using this time to continue to reach out to residents and others to educate and answer questions related to the proposals. We’re inviting opponents into the dialogue so we can gain a better understanding of what their issues and concerns are, and hopefully come up with ideas we can adapt to make these work.

I also want to take this opportunity to clarify some facts and misconceptions about the proposals.

The proposal to existing Ch59 Comprehensive Occupancy is only proposing a change in the “legal occupant” age from 22 down to 18. At 22, we have the reality of having 18 -21 year olds enter into a rental agreement, and live in a potential overcrowded house, by which today they are not considered in the number of legal occupants.

Note: The change to remove the number of vehicle clause from Ch59 Comprehensive Occupancy is not our task force proposal, but a legal department directive to remove it from the rental code ordinance.

The proposal to existing Ch170 Rental Code is proposing we change the violation penalty from $100 up to $300; which is the maximum allowed penalty under MA General Law.

The proposal to existing CH133 Noise Ordinance proposes to add the property owner into the penalty assessment if the property is identified as a having a documented chronic noise problem. By including the property owner in the fines, we have closed the gap where transient tenants “wait out” the fine process, and put the burden on property owners to have accountability for who they rent to. If the property owner is in the process of actively addressing the tenant(s), and/or demonstrating they are working with neighbors and police to correct the situation, they will not continue to be assessed. Some opponents say this will infringe on a person’s individual rights, but currently the noise ordinance is already in effect and perpetrators are cited when they violate the ordinance;  however, they are typically thrown out of court or wait it out until their lease ends never to be seen again, and a new tenant comes in and repeats the nuisance cycle. There is no incentive to curtail the repeated documented behavior or for the owner to take responsibility on who they place in our neighborhoods.

The New CH 160 – Chronic Problem Properties proposes to define a coherent method of addressing the adverse effects on the health, safety, welfare, and quality of life of residents arising from properties where illegal activity occurs on a regular basis.  Illegal activity is the key word. Some opponents claim that if their dog knocks over their neighbor’s trash can they will be fined on each occurrence. In reality, unless knocking over your neighbor’s trash can is a criminal activity in their village, the owner would not be fined.  The perception is that it would target specific groups or neighborhoods, and the honest answer is yes, but not negatively; we see this as a support line for the good, law-abiding residents in our Town who live with this activity going on around them every single day, and who want this repeated illegal activity element gone from their neighborhoods. If we can stop one, we’ve helped hundreds. Again, if the property owner is actively working with police and the courts to correct this situation, they would not continue to be assessed.

The New CH 54 – Building Property Maintenance – is to address nuisances, such as deteriorated structures, vacant buildings, etc. which cause and contribute to blight within neighborhoods and commercial areas,  which adversely affect the value of adjacent and surrounding property and impair the health, safety and general welfare of the inhabitants of the town. Despite what some opponents think currently, there is nothing on the books that we can enforce on abandoned or neglected property owners to bring it up to minimal accepted standards.  Boarded up windows and over growth above the windows continue to thrive in our neighborhoods,  devaluing surrounding properties, and creating a potential risk to the neighbors living there. We have a growing list of properties which all the villages have identified, where nothing can be done. Each one has been brought up to our regulatory inspectors, but they were found they are not in violation of current ordinances. Even using the BIRST team is fruitless, as there is no immediate threat to the public because the doors are boarded up, and no one “can access it.”  Tell that to the neighbors who have to keep their kids inside because vermin and other critters living in the over growth must cross through their property to get there; or the risk of having kids or others, find a way inside the premises. We shouldn’t allow owners of neglected or abandoned properties to let their properties deteriorate at the expense of quality of life of others.  One look at the property across from the Elementary School on Bearses Way says it all.

We have worked hard to reach out to all of the villages, understand what their needs are, and we’ll continue to do so. We hope we can work together in addressing the issues or concerns of opponents, and are open to discuss and adapt the proposals with suggestions. If anyone is interested in meeting with us, they can contact me at GreatHyannis@aol.com .

I would like to thank our GHCA Task Force members and the Town Staff who worked diligently on this project for the past 18 months, and everyone else who has been supporting us along the way. I am asking for their continued support and to come to the Dec 6th council meeting to have the Councilors, and the public, hear their voices. Remember, it started with a question… how can we improve Hyannis…take back our village, our neighborhood, and Town? The Voices of The Villages are strong, and we want to do whatever it takes to make all of Barnstable a great place to live.

Sincerely,

Laura Cronin, GHCA VOV LRR Task Force

Hyannis, MA
Greater Hyannis Civic Association Board Meeting Report – January 8, hospital
2013

The following topics were discussed at the January Board of Directors Meeting.

Richard Elrick and Allyson Alessi joined is from R.E.C to give a presentation about “Pay as You Throw.” (PAYT) The Hyannis contract with SEMASS expires in 2014 and the rate will probably go up, so it is an appropriate time to look into other waste reduction programs.  Curbside and Transfer Station PAYT has been tested and used by other communities in MA and has proven to be cost-effective and efficient.  Users will pay according to the amount of solid waste they dispose of but recycled trash will be free.  The goal is reduce the amount of solid waste and also increase recycling. There are various models, and we have not decided on which we might use as yet (purchase special disposal bags, stickers, etc.)  There would be a fixed, annual cost plus a variable cost paid for either bag or sticker.  The total cost to citizens will be less than the present model, plus the Town will have access to Mass DEP grants and funding. Note that citizens can opt-out of this program if they can provide trash removal and recycling with a private hauler.  Several private haulers will be asked to bid on this town-wide program.

The proposed VoV Landlords, Rentals, and Regulations ordinances will be reviewed and worked upon by the Town Councilors on January 10 to implement the suggestions made during the open meeting in December.  This is not a meeting for open comment, but members of the GHCA and others are invited to sit in.  The final ordinances will be reviewed and voted on during the January 17 Town Councilors’ meeting.

Membership – the Board will spend considerable time during the February 12th Board meeting to discuss how to increase membership.  So far we have 153 household names, 35% of which have not paid their current dues.  We would like to increase paying membership to 200 households.  We will be brainstorming how to increase membership, the benefit of being a member, how to get local businesses involved in membership, and other ideas.  All members of GHCA are encouraged to attend the February Board meeting and give input to this very vital topic.

The GHCA is having its next General Meeting in April, open to all members (and public), to meet your councilors at the Town Hall Councilors’ room as before,  but in a more relaxed, informal set-up.  More details will follow.

The GHCA Annual meeting is held in May, we are shooting for Tues. May 21 once again at the Hyannis Yacht Club.  We will hold elections and update members on the past year, and on up-coming 2014 events.  We are also aiming for a guest speaker.  Watch the web site for more details.
The Hyannis Town Council will conmtinue public comment on the proposed VoV Landlords, viagra Rentals, and Regulations ordinances during the Town Council Meeting on January
This letter was sent to the “Letters to the Editor” column of the Barnstable Patriot and Enterprise.

Date: 11/7/12

While we are disappointed with the recent delay of the Town Council workshop on some proposed ordinance changes and additions which the GHCA Voices of the Village Task Force – Landlords-Rentals & Regulations have been working on, troche  we are busy using this time to continue to reach out to residents and others to educate and answer questions related to the proposals. We’re inviting opponents into the dialogue so we can gain a better understanding of what their issues and concerns are, and hopefully come up with ideas we can adapt to make these work.

I also want to take this opportunity to clarify some facts and misconceptions about the proposals.

The proposal to existing Ch59 Comprehensive Occupancy is only proposing a change in the “legal occupant” age from 22 down to 18. At 22, we have the reality of having 18 -21 year olds enter into a rental agreement, and live in a potential overcrowded house, by which today they are not considered in the number of legal occupants.

Note: The change to remove the number of vehicle clause from Ch59 Comprehensive Occupancy is not our task force proposal, but a legal department directive to remove it from the rental code ordinance.

The proposal to existing Ch170 Rental Code is proposing we change the violation penalty from $100 up to $300; which is the maximum allowed penalty under MA General Law.

The proposal to existing CH133 Noise Ordinance proposes to add the property owner into the penalty assessment if the property is identified as a having a documented chronic noise problem. By including the property owner in the fines, we have closed the gap where transient tenants “wait out” the fine process, and put the burden on property owners to have accountability for who they rent to. If the property owner is in the process of actively addressing the tenant(s), and/or demonstrating they are working with neighbors and police to correct the situation, they will not continue to be assessed. Some opponents say this will infringe on a person’s individual rights, but currently the noise ordinance is already in effect and perpetrators are cited when they violate the ordinance;  however, they are typically thrown out of court or wait it out until their lease ends never to be seen again, and a new tenant comes in and repeats the nuisance cycle. There is no incentive to curtail the repeated documented behavior or for the owner to take responsibility on who they place in our neighborhoods.

The New CH 160 – Chronic Problem Properties proposes to define a coherent method of addressing the adverse effects on the health, safety, welfare, and quality of life of residents arising from properties where illegal activity occurs on a regular basis.  Illegal activity is the key word. Some opponents claim that if their dog knocks over their neighbor’s trash can they will be fined on each occurrence. In reality, unless knocking over your neighbor’s trash can is a criminal activity in their village, the owner would not be fined.  The perception is that it would target specific groups or neighborhoods, and the honest answer is yes, but not negatively; we see this as a support line for the good, law-abiding residents in our Town who live with this activity going on around them every single day, and who want this repeated illegal activity element gone from their neighborhoods. If we can stop one, we’ve helped hundreds. Again, if the property owner is actively working with police and the courts to correct this situation, they would not continue to be assessed.

The New CH 54 – Building Property Maintenance – is to address nuisances, such as deteriorated structures, vacant buildings, etc. which cause and contribute to blight within neighborhoods and commercial areas,  which adversely affect the value of adjacent and surrounding property and impair the health, safety and general welfare of the inhabitants of the town. Despite what some opponents think currently, there is nothing on the books that we can enforce on abandoned or neglected property owners to bring it up to minimal accepted standards.  Boarded up windows and over growth above the windows continue to thrive in our neighborhoods,  devaluing surrounding properties, and creating a potential risk to the neighbors living there. We have a growing list of properties which all the villages have identified, where nothing can be done. Each one has been brought up to our regulatory inspectors, but they were found they are not in violation of current ordinances. Even using the BIRST team is fruitless, as there is no immediate threat to the public because the doors are boarded up, and no one “can access it.”  Tell that to the neighbors who have to keep their kids inside because vermin and other critters living in the over growth must cross through their property to get there; or the risk of having kids or others, find a way inside the premises. We shouldn’t allow owners of neglected or abandoned properties to let their properties deteriorate at the expense of quality of life of others.  One look at the property across from the Elementary School on Bearses Way says it all.

We have worked hard to reach out to all of the villages, understand what their needs are, and we’ll continue to do so. We hope we can work together in addressing the issues or concerns of opponents, and are open to discuss and adapt the proposals with suggestions. If anyone is interested in meeting with us, they can contact me at GreatHyannis@aol.com .

I would like to thank our GHCA Task Force members and the Town Staff who worked diligently on this project for the past 18 months, and everyone else who has been supporting us along the way. I am asking for their continued support and to come to the Dec 6th council meeting to have the Councilors, and the public, hear their voices. Remember, it started with a question… how can we improve Hyannis…take back our village, our neighborhood, and Town? The Voices of The Villages are strong, and we want to do whatever it takes to make all of Barnstable a great place to live.

Sincerely,

Laura Cronin, GHCA VOV LRR Task Force

Hyannis, MA
Greater Hyannis Civic Association Board Meeting Report – January 8, hospital
2013

The following topics were discussed at the January Board of Directors Meeting.

Richard Elrick and Allyson Alessi joined is from R.E.C to give a presentation about “Pay as You Throw.” (PAYT) The Hyannis contract with SEMASS expires in 2014 and the rate will probably go up, so it is an appropriate time to look into other waste reduction programs.  Curbside and Transfer Station PAYT has been tested and used by other communities in MA and has proven to be cost-effective and efficient.  Users will pay according to the amount of solid waste they dispose of but recycled trash will be free.  The goal is reduce the amount of solid waste and also increase recycling. There are various models, and we have not decided on which we might use as yet (purchase special disposal bags, stickers, etc.)  There would be a fixed, annual cost plus a variable cost paid for either bag or sticker.  The total cost to citizens will be less than the present model, plus the Town will have access to Mass DEP grants and funding. Note that citizens can opt-out of this program if they can provide trash removal and recycling with a private hauler.  Several private haulers will be asked to bid on this town-wide program.

The proposed VoV Landlords, Rentals, and Regulations ordinances will be reviewed and worked upon by the Town Councilors on January 10 to implement the suggestions made during the open meeting in December.  This is not a meeting for open comment, but members of the GHCA and others are invited to sit in.  The final ordinances will be reviewed and voted on during the January 17 Town Councilors’ meeting.

Membership – the Board will spend considerable time during the February 12th Board meeting to discuss how to increase membership.  So far we have 153 household names, 35% of which have not paid their current dues.  We would like to increase paying membership to 200 households.  We will be brainstorming how to increase membership, the benefit of being a member, how to get local businesses involved in membership, and other ideas.  All members of GHCA are encouraged to attend the February Board meeting and give input to this very vital topic.

The GHCA is having its next General Meeting in April, open to all members (and public), to meet your councilors at the Town Hall Councilors’ room as before,  but in a more relaxed, informal set-up.  More details will follow.

The GHCA Annual meeting is held in May, we are shooting for Tues. May 21 once again at the Hyannis Yacht Club.  We will hold elections and update members on the past year, and on up-coming 2014 events.  We are also aiming for a guest speaker.  Watch the web site for more details.
The Board will spend considerable time at the February 12th Board meeting discussing how to increase GHCA membership. We will be brainstorming how to increase membership, buy viagra site the benefit of being a member, check how to get local businesses involved in membership, and other ideas.  All members of GHCA are encouraged to attend the February Board meeting and give input to this very vital topic.
The Hyannis Town Council will conmtinue public comment on the proposed VoV Landlords, viagra Rentals, and Regulations ordinances during the Town Council Meeting on January
This letter was sent to the “Letters to the Editor” column of the Barnstable Patriot and Enterprise.

Date: 11/7/12

While we are disappointed with the recent delay of the Town Council workshop on some proposed ordinance changes and additions which the GHCA Voices of the Village Task Force – Landlords-Rentals & Regulations have been working on, troche  we are busy using this time to continue to reach out to residents and others to educate and answer questions related to the proposals. We’re inviting opponents into the dialogue so we can gain a better understanding of what their issues and concerns are, and hopefully come up with ideas we can adapt to make these work.

I also want to take this opportunity to clarify some facts and misconceptions about the proposals.

The proposal to existing Ch59 Comprehensive Occupancy is only proposing a change in the “legal occupant” age from 22 down to 18. At 22, we have the reality of having 18 -21 year olds enter into a rental agreement, and live in a potential overcrowded house, by which today they are not considered in the number of legal occupants.

Note: The change to remove the number of vehicle clause from Ch59 Comprehensive Occupancy is not our task force proposal, but a legal department directive to remove it from the rental code ordinance.

The proposal to existing Ch170 Rental Code is proposing we change the violation penalty from $100 up to $300; which is the maximum allowed penalty under MA General Law.

The proposal to existing CH133 Noise Ordinance proposes to add the property owner into the penalty assessment if the property is identified as a having a documented chronic noise problem. By including the property owner in the fines, we have closed the gap where transient tenants “wait out” the fine process, and put the burden on property owners to have accountability for who they rent to. If the property owner is in the process of actively addressing the tenant(s), and/or demonstrating they are working with neighbors and police to correct the situation, they will not continue to be assessed. Some opponents say this will infringe on a person’s individual rights, but currently the noise ordinance is already in effect and perpetrators are cited when they violate the ordinance;  however, they are typically thrown out of court or wait it out until their lease ends never to be seen again, and a new tenant comes in and repeats the nuisance cycle. There is no incentive to curtail the repeated documented behavior or for the owner to take responsibility on who they place in our neighborhoods.

The New CH 160 – Chronic Problem Properties proposes to define a coherent method of addressing the adverse effects on the health, safety, welfare, and quality of life of residents arising from properties where illegal activity occurs on a regular basis.  Illegal activity is the key word. Some opponents claim that if their dog knocks over their neighbor’s trash can they will be fined on each occurrence. In reality, unless knocking over your neighbor’s trash can is a criminal activity in their village, the owner would not be fined.  The perception is that it would target specific groups or neighborhoods, and the honest answer is yes, but not negatively; we see this as a support line for the good, law-abiding residents in our Town who live with this activity going on around them every single day, and who want this repeated illegal activity element gone from their neighborhoods. If we can stop one, we’ve helped hundreds. Again, if the property owner is actively working with police and the courts to correct this situation, they would not continue to be assessed.

The New CH 54 – Building Property Maintenance – is to address nuisances, such as deteriorated structures, vacant buildings, etc. which cause and contribute to blight within neighborhoods and commercial areas,  which adversely affect the value of adjacent and surrounding property and impair the health, safety and general welfare of the inhabitants of the town. Despite what some opponents think currently, there is nothing on the books that we can enforce on abandoned or neglected property owners to bring it up to minimal accepted standards.  Boarded up windows and over growth above the windows continue to thrive in our neighborhoods,  devaluing surrounding properties, and creating a potential risk to the neighbors living there. We have a growing list of properties which all the villages have identified, where nothing can be done. Each one has been brought up to our regulatory inspectors, but they were found they are not in violation of current ordinances. Even using the BIRST team is fruitless, as there is no immediate threat to the public because the doors are boarded up, and no one “can access it.”  Tell that to the neighbors who have to keep their kids inside because vermin and other critters living in the over growth must cross through their property to get there; or the risk of having kids or others, find a way inside the premises. We shouldn’t allow owners of neglected or abandoned properties to let their properties deteriorate at the expense of quality of life of others.  One look at the property across from the Elementary School on Bearses Way says it all.

We have worked hard to reach out to all of the villages, understand what their needs are, and we’ll continue to do so. We hope we can work together in addressing the issues or concerns of opponents, and are open to discuss and adapt the proposals with suggestions. If anyone is interested in meeting with us, they can contact me at GreatHyannis@aol.com .

I would like to thank our GHCA Task Force members and the Town Staff who worked diligently on this project for the past 18 months, and everyone else who has been supporting us along the way. I am asking for their continued support and to come to the Dec 6th council meeting to have the Councilors, and the public, hear their voices. Remember, it started with a question… how can we improve Hyannis…take back our village, our neighborhood, and Town? The Voices of The Villages are strong, and we want to do whatever it takes to make all of Barnstable a great place to live.

Sincerely,

Laura Cronin, GHCA VOV LRR Task Force

Hyannis, MA
Greater Hyannis Civic Association Board Meeting Report – January 8, hospital
2013

The following topics were discussed at the January Board of Directors Meeting.

Richard Elrick and Allyson Alessi joined is from R.E.C to give a presentation about “Pay as You Throw.” (PAYT) The Hyannis contract with SEMASS expires in 2014 and the rate will probably go up, so it is an appropriate time to look into other waste reduction programs.  Curbside and Transfer Station PAYT has been tested and used by other communities in MA and has proven to be cost-effective and efficient.  Users will pay according to the amount of solid waste they dispose of but recycled trash will be free.  The goal is reduce the amount of solid waste and also increase recycling. There are various models, and we have not decided on which we might use as yet (purchase special disposal bags, stickers, etc.)  There would be a fixed, annual cost plus a variable cost paid for either bag or sticker.  The total cost to citizens will be less than the present model, plus the Town will have access to Mass DEP grants and funding. Note that citizens can opt-out of this program if they can provide trash removal and recycling with a private hauler.  Several private haulers will be asked to bid on this town-wide program.

The proposed VoV Landlords, Rentals, and Regulations ordinances will be reviewed and worked upon by the Town Councilors on January 10 to implement the suggestions made during the open meeting in December.  This is not a meeting for open comment, but members of the GHCA and others are invited to sit in.  The final ordinances will be reviewed and voted on during the January 17 Town Councilors’ meeting.

Membership – the Board will spend considerable time during the February 12th Board meeting to discuss how to increase membership.  So far we have 153 household names, 35% of which have not paid their current dues.  We would like to increase paying membership to 200 households.  We will be brainstorming how to increase membership, the benefit of being a member, how to get local businesses involved in membership, and other ideas.  All members of GHCA are encouraged to attend the February Board meeting and give input to this very vital topic.

The GHCA is having its next General Meeting in April, open to all members (and public), to meet your councilors at the Town Hall Councilors’ room as before,  but in a more relaxed, informal set-up.  More details will follow.

The GHCA Annual meeting is held in May, we are shooting for Tues. May 21 once again at the Hyannis Yacht Club.  We will hold elections and update members on the past year, and on up-coming 2014 events.  We are also aiming for a guest speaker.  Watch the web site for more details.
The Board will spend considerable time at the February 12th Board meeting discussing how to increase GHCA membership. We will be brainstorming how to increase membership, buy viagra site the benefit of being a member, check how to get local businesses involved in membership, and other ideas.  All members of GHCA are encouraged to attend the February Board meeting and give input to this very vital topic.
The Board will spend considerable time at the February 12th Board meeting discussing how to increase GHCA membership. We will be brainstorming how to increase membership, store the benefit of being a member, seek how to get local businesses involved in membership, and other ideas.  All members of GHCA are encouraged to attend the February Board meeting and give input to this very vital topic.
The Hyannis Town Council will conmtinue public comment on the proposed VoV Landlords, viagra Rentals, and Regulations ordinances during the Town Council Meeting on January
This letter was sent to the “Letters to the Editor” column of the Barnstable Patriot and Enterprise.

Date: 11/7/12

While we are disappointed with the recent delay of the Town Council workshop on some proposed ordinance changes and additions which the GHCA Voices of the Village Task Force – Landlords-Rentals & Regulations have been working on, troche  we are busy using this time to continue to reach out to residents and others to educate and answer questions related to the proposals. We’re inviting opponents into the dialogue so we can gain a better understanding of what their issues and concerns are, and hopefully come up with ideas we can adapt to make these work.

I also want to take this opportunity to clarify some facts and misconceptions about the proposals.

The proposal to existing Ch59 Comprehensive Occupancy is only proposing a change in the “legal occupant” age from 22 down to 18. At 22, we have the reality of having 18 -21 year olds enter into a rental agreement, and live in a potential overcrowded house, by which today they are not considered in the number of legal occupants.

Note: The change to remove the number of vehicle clause from Ch59 Comprehensive Occupancy is not our task force proposal, but a legal department directive to remove it from the rental code ordinance.

The proposal to existing Ch170 Rental Code is proposing we change the violation penalty from $100 up to $300; which is the maximum allowed penalty under MA General Law.

The proposal to existing CH133 Noise Ordinance proposes to add the property owner into the penalty assessment if the property is identified as a having a documented chronic noise problem. By including the property owner in the fines, we have closed the gap where transient tenants “wait out” the fine process, and put the burden on property owners to have accountability for who they rent to. If the property owner is in the process of actively addressing the tenant(s), and/or demonstrating they are working with neighbors and police to correct the situation, they will not continue to be assessed. Some opponents say this will infringe on a person’s individual rights, but currently the noise ordinance is already in effect and perpetrators are cited when they violate the ordinance;  however, they are typically thrown out of court or wait it out until their lease ends never to be seen again, and a new tenant comes in and repeats the nuisance cycle. There is no incentive to curtail the repeated documented behavior or for the owner to take responsibility on who they place in our neighborhoods.

The New CH 160 – Chronic Problem Properties proposes to define a coherent method of addressing the adverse effects on the health, safety, welfare, and quality of life of residents arising from properties where illegal activity occurs on a regular basis.  Illegal activity is the key word. Some opponents claim that if their dog knocks over their neighbor’s trash can they will be fined on each occurrence. In reality, unless knocking over your neighbor’s trash can is a criminal activity in their village, the owner would not be fined.  The perception is that it would target specific groups or neighborhoods, and the honest answer is yes, but not negatively; we see this as a support line for the good, law-abiding residents in our Town who live with this activity going on around them every single day, and who want this repeated illegal activity element gone from their neighborhoods. If we can stop one, we’ve helped hundreds. Again, if the property owner is actively working with police and the courts to correct this situation, they would not continue to be assessed.

The New CH 54 – Building Property Maintenance – is to address nuisances, such as deteriorated structures, vacant buildings, etc. which cause and contribute to blight within neighborhoods and commercial areas,  which adversely affect the value of adjacent and surrounding property and impair the health, safety and general welfare of the inhabitants of the town. Despite what some opponents think currently, there is nothing on the books that we can enforce on abandoned or neglected property owners to bring it up to minimal accepted standards.  Boarded up windows and over growth above the windows continue to thrive in our neighborhoods,  devaluing surrounding properties, and creating a potential risk to the neighbors living there. We have a growing list of properties which all the villages have identified, where nothing can be done. Each one has been brought up to our regulatory inspectors, but they were found they are not in violation of current ordinances. Even using the BIRST team is fruitless, as there is no immediate threat to the public because the doors are boarded up, and no one “can access it.”  Tell that to the neighbors who have to keep their kids inside because vermin and other critters living in the over growth must cross through their property to get there; or the risk of having kids or others, find a way inside the premises. We shouldn’t allow owners of neglected or abandoned properties to let their properties deteriorate at the expense of quality of life of others.  One look at the property across from the Elementary School on Bearses Way says it all.

We have worked hard to reach out to all of the villages, understand what their needs are, and we’ll continue to do so. We hope we can work together in addressing the issues or concerns of opponents, and are open to discuss and adapt the proposals with suggestions. If anyone is interested in meeting with us, they can contact me at GreatHyannis@aol.com .

I would like to thank our GHCA Task Force members and the Town Staff who worked diligently on this project for the past 18 months, and everyone else who has been supporting us along the way. I am asking for their continued support and to come to the Dec 6th council meeting to have the Councilors, and the public, hear their voices. Remember, it started with a question… how can we improve Hyannis…take back our village, our neighborhood, and Town? The Voices of The Villages are strong, and we want to do whatever it takes to make all of Barnstable a great place to live.

Sincerely,

Laura Cronin, GHCA VOV LRR Task Force

Hyannis, MA
Greater Hyannis Civic Association Board Meeting Report – January 8, hospital
2013

The following topics were discussed at the January Board of Directors Meeting.

Richard Elrick and Allyson Alessi joined is from R.E.C to give a presentation about “Pay as You Throw.” (PAYT) The Hyannis contract with SEMASS expires in 2014 and the rate will probably go up, so it is an appropriate time to look into other waste reduction programs.  Curbside and Transfer Station PAYT has been tested and used by other communities in MA and has proven to be cost-effective and efficient.  Users will pay according to the amount of solid waste they dispose of but recycled trash will be free.  The goal is reduce the amount of solid waste and also increase recycling. There are various models, and we have not decided on which we might use as yet (purchase special disposal bags, stickers, etc.)  There would be a fixed, annual cost plus a variable cost paid for either bag or sticker.  The total cost to citizens will be less than the present model, plus the Town will have access to Mass DEP grants and funding. Note that citizens can opt-out of this program if they can provide trash removal and recycling with a private hauler.  Several private haulers will be asked to bid on this town-wide program.

The proposed VoV Landlords, Rentals, and Regulations ordinances will be reviewed and worked upon by the Town Councilors on January 10 to implement the suggestions made during the open meeting in December.  This is not a meeting for open comment, but members of the GHCA and others are invited to sit in.  The final ordinances will be reviewed and voted on during the January 17 Town Councilors’ meeting.

Membership – the Board will spend considerable time during the February 12th Board meeting to discuss how to increase membership.  So far we have 153 household names, 35% of which have not paid their current dues.  We would like to increase paying membership to 200 households.  We will be brainstorming how to increase membership, the benefit of being a member, how to get local businesses involved in membership, and other ideas.  All members of GHCA are encouraged to attend the February Board meeting and give input to this very vital topic.

The GHCA is having its next General Meeting in April, open to all members (and public), to meet your councilors at the Town Hall Councilors’ room as before,  but in a more relaxed, informal set-up.  More details will follow.

The GHCA Annual meeting is held in May, we are shooting for Tues. May 21 once again at the Hyannis Yacht Club.  We will hold elections and update members on the past year, and on up-coming 2014 events.  We are also aiming for a guest speaker.  Watch the web site for more details.
The Board will spend considerable time at the February 12th Board meeting discussing how to increase GHCA membership. We will be brainstorming how to increase membership, buy viagra site the benefit of being a member, check how to get local businesses involved in membership, and other ideas.  All members of GHCA are encouraged to attend the February Board meeting and give input to this very vital topic.
The Board will spend considerable time at the February 12th Board meeting discussing how to increase GHCA membership. We will be brainstorming how to increase membership, store the benefit of being a member, seek how to get local businesses involved in membership, and other ideas.  All members of GHCA are encouraged to attend the February Board meeting and give input to this very vital topic.
rental picture

The Town Council voted and approved the New VoV LRR Ordinance CH 160 Chronic Problem Properties, diagnosis This ordinance was worked on through a Town Council Workshop on 1/10/13, diagnosis and re-submitted before the Council on 1/17/13. Additional discussion ensued and amendments were made, and a final draft was approved by the Council. This ordinance will allow the police department to engage the landlord or property owner in problems in the properties they own. It allows the dialogue to start early, and leaves adequate time for them to be heard and address the situation before being assessed costs. This is a great win for the residents of Barnstable in helping them to take back their neighborhoods, and improve their quality of life.

The Town Council voted and approved the proposed amendment to existing Ordinance CH 59 Comprehensive Occupancy, This ordinance changes the age of the “Occupant” from 22 down to 18. This will help to address the properties which are over-crowded with 18 – 21 year olds, who have entered into a lease agreement, but is not considered over crowded because before they were not a “legal occupant.”  This will go a long way to minimize the over-crowded rental properties that have disrupted our neighborhoods for a long time.

The remaining ordinance proposals are scheduled for a workshop on 2/14/13, and will be resubmitted for Public Hearing before the Council on 2/21/13. These ordinances are:

CH133 (Existing) – Noise Ordinance proposed change which will add the property owner/landlord accountable for chronic noise violations

CH170 (Existing) – Rental code proposal to increase the fine for violations from $100 to $300.

CH 54 (NEW) Property Maintenance – setting minimum standards for properties that are detrimental and devaluing our neighborhoods;

A big thanks to all of the Greater Hyannis residents who started this message and process through the Voices of the Village, and who worked hard on helping us be successful in getting these two passed.  Please continue your support as we work to get the remaining ones through the process and approved.

Laura Cronin

 
The Hyannis Town Council will conmtinue public comment on the proposed VoV Landlords, viagra Rentals, and Regulations ordinances during the Town Council Meeting on January
This letter was sent to the “Letters to the Editor” column of the Barnstable Patriot and Enterprise.

Date: 11/7/12

While we are disappointed with the recent delay of the Town Council workshop on some proposed ordinance changes and additions which the GHCA Voices of the Village Task Force – Landlords-Rentals & Regulations have been working on, troche  we are busy using this time to continue to reach out to residents and others to educate and answer questions related to the proposals. We’re inviting opponents into the dialogue so we can gain a better understanding of what their issues and concerns are, and hopefully come up with ideas we can adapt to make these work.

I also want to take this opportunity to clarify some facts and misconceptions about the proposals.

The proposal to existing Ch59 Comprehensive Occupancy is only proposing a change in the “legal occupant” age from 22 down to 18. At 22, we have the reality of having 18 -21 year olds enter into a rental agreement, and live in a potential overcrowded house, by which today they are not considered in the number of legal occupants.

Note: The change to remove the number of vehicle clause from Ch59 Comprehensive Occupancy is not our task force proposal, but a legal department directive to remove it from the rental code ordinance.

The proposal to existing Ch170 Rental Code is proposing we change the violation penalty from $100 up to $300; which is the maximum allowed penalty under MA General Law.

The proposal to existing CH133 Noise Ordinance proposes to add the property owner into the penalty assessment if the property is identified as a having a documented chronic noise problem. By including the property owner in the fines, we have closed the gap where transient tenants “wait out” the fine process, and put the burden on property owners to have accountability for who they rent to. If the property owner is in the process of actively addressing the tenant(s), and/or demonstrating they are working with neighbors and police to correct the situation, they will not continue to be assessed. Some opponents say this will infringe on a person’s individual rights, but currently the noise ordinance is already in effect and perpetrators are cited when they violate the ordinance;  however, they are typically thrown out of court or wait it out until their lease ends never to be seen again, and a new tenant comes in and repeats the nuisance cycle. There is no incentive to curtail the repeated documented behavior or for the owner to take responsibility on who they place in our neighborhoods.

The New CH 160 – Chronic Problem Properties proposes to define a coherent method of addressing the adverse effects on the health, safety, welfare, and quality of life of residents arising from properties where illegal activity occurs on a regular basis.  Illegal activity is the key word. Some opponents claim that if their dog knocks over their neighbor’s trash can they will be fined on each occurrence. In reality, unless knocking over your neighbor’s trash can is a criminal activity in their village, the owner would not be fined.  The perception is that it would target specific groups or neighborhoods, and the honest answer is yes, but not negatively; we see this as a support line for the good, law-abiding residents in our Town who live with this activity going on around them every single day, and who want this repeated illegal activity element gone from their neighborhoods. If we can stop one, we’ve helped hundreds. Again, if the property owner is actively working with police and the courts to correct this situation, they would not continue to be assessed.

The New CH 54 – Building Property Maintenance – is to address nuisances, such as deteriorated structures, vacant buildings, etc. which cause and contribute to blight within neighborhoods and commercial areas,  which adversely affect the value of adjacent and surrounding property and impair the health, safety and general welfare of the inhabitants of the town. Despite what some opponents think currently, there is nothing on the books that we can enforce on abandoned or neglected property owners to bring it up to minimal accepted standards.  Boarded up windows and over growth above the windows continue to thrive in our neighborhoods,  devaluing surrounding properties, and creating a potential risk to the neighbors living there. We have a growing list of properties which all the villages have identified, where nothing can be done. Each one has been brought up to our regulatory inspectors, but they were found they are not in violation of current ordinances. Even using the BIRST team is fruitless, as there is no immediate threat to the public because the doors are boarded up, and no one “can access it.”  Tell that to the neighbors who have to keep their kids inside because vermin and other critters living in the over growth must cross through their property to get there; or the risk of having kids or others, find a way inside the premises. We shouldn’t allow owners of neglected or abandoned properties to let their properties deteriorate at the expense of quality of life of others.  One look at the property across from the Elementary School on Bearses Way says it all.

We have worked hard to reach out to all of the villages, understand what their needs are, and we’ll continue to do so. We hope we can work together in addressing the issues or concerns of opponents, and are open to discuss and adapt the proposals with suggestions. If anyone is interested in meeting with us, they can contact me at GreatHyannis@aol.com .

I would like to thank our GHCA Task Force members and the Town Staff who worked diligently on this project for the past 18 months, and everyone else who has been supporting us along the way. I am asking for their continued support and to come to the Dec 6th council meeting to have the Councilors, and the public, hear their voices. Remember, it started with a question… how can we improve Hyannis…take back our village, our neighborhood, and Town? The Voices of The Villages are strong, and we want to do whatever it takes to make all of Barnstable a great place to live.

Sincerely,

Laura Cronin, GHCA VOV LRR Task Force

Hyannis, MA
Greater Hyannis Civic Association Board Meeting Report – January 8, hospital
2013

The following topics were discussed at the January Board of Directors Meeting.

Richard Elrick and Allyson Alessi joined is from R.E.C to give a presentation about “Pay as You Throw.” (PAYT) The Hyannis contract with SEMASS expires in 2014 and the rate will probably go up, so it is an appropriate time to look into other waste reduction programs.  Curbside and Transfer Station PAYT has been tested and used by other communities in MA and has proven to be cost-effective and efficient.  Users will pay according to the amount of solid waste they dispose of but recycled trash will be free.  The goal is reduce the amount of solid waste and also increase recycling. There are various models, and we have not decided on which we might use as yet (purchase special disposal bags, stickers, etc.)  There would be a fixed, annual cost plus a variable cost paid for either bag or sticker.  The total cost to citizens will be less than the present model, plus the Town will have access to Mass DEP grants and funding. Note that citizens can opt-out of this program if they can provide trash removal and recycling with a private hauler.  Several private haulers will be asked to bid on this town-wide program.

The proposed VoV Landlords, Rentals, and Regulations ordinances will be reviewed and worked upon by the Town Councilors on January 10 to implement the suggestions made during the open meeting in December.  This is not a meeting for open comment, but members of the GHCA and others are invited to sit in.  The final ordinances will be reviewed and voted on during the January 17 Town Councilors’ meeting.

Membership – the Board will spend considerable time during the February 12th Board meeting to discuss how to increase membership.  So far we have 153 household names, 35% of which have not paid their current dues.  We would like to increase paying membership to 200 households.  We will be brainstorming how to increase membership, the benefit of being a member, how to get local businesses involved in membership, and other ideas.  All members of GHCA are encouraged to attend the February Board meeting and give input to this very vital topic.

The GHCA is having its next General Meeting in April, open to all members (and public), to meet your councilors at the Town Hall Councilors’ room as before,  but in a more relaxed, informal set-up.  More details will follow.

The GHCA Annual meeting is held in May, we are shooting for Tues. May 21 once again at the Hyannis Yacht Club.  We will hold elections and update members on the past year, and on up-coming 2014 events.  We are also aiming for a guest speaker.  Watch the web site for more details.
The Board will spend considerable time at the February 12th Board meeting discussing how to increase GHCA membership. We will be brainstorming how to increase membership, buy viagra site the benefit of being a member, check how to get local businesses involved in membership, and other ideas.  All members of GHCA are encouraged to attend the February Board meeting and give input to this very vital topic.
The Board will spend considerable time at the February 12th Board meeting discussing how to increase GHCA membership. We will be brainstorming how to increase membership, store the benefit of being a member, seek how to get local businesses involved in membership, and other ideas.  All members of GHCA are encouraged to attend the February Board meeting and give input to this very vital topic.
rental picture

The Town Council voted and approved the New VoV LRR Ordinance CH 160 Chronic Problem Properties, diagnosis This ordinance was worked on through a Town Council Workshop on 1/10/13, diagnosis and re-submitted before the Council on 1/17/13. Additional discussion ensued and amendments were made, and a final draft was approved by the Council. This ordinance will allow the police department to engage the landlord or property owner in problems in the properties they own. It allows the dialogue to start early, and leaves adequate time for them to be heard and address the situation before being assessed costs. This is a great win for the residents of Barnstable in helping them to take back their neighborhoods, and improve their quality of life.

The Town Council voted and approved the proposed amendment to existing Ordinance CH 59 Comprehensive Occupancy, This ordinance changes the age of the “Occupant” from 22 down to 18. This will help to address the properties which are over-crowded with 18 – 21 year olds, who have entered into a lease agreement, but is not considered over crowded because before they were not a “legal occupant.”  This will go a long way to minimize the over-crowded rental properties that have disrupted our neighborhoods for a long time.

The remaining ordinance proposals are scheduled for a workshop on 2/14/13, and will be resubmitted for Public Hearing before the Council on 2/21/13. These ordinances are:

CH133 (Existing) – Noise Ordinance proposed change which will add the property owner/landlord accountable for chronic noise violations

CH170 (Existing) – Rental code proposal to increase the fine for violations from $100 to $300.

CH 54 (NEW) Property Maintenance – setting minimum standards for properties that are detrimental and devaluing our neighborhoods;

A big thanks to all of the Greater Hyannis residents who started this message and process through the Voices of the Village, and who worked hard on helping us be successful in getting these two passed.  Please continue your support as we work to get the remaining ones through the process and approved.

Laura Cronin

 
rental picture

The Town Council voted and approved the New VoV LRR Ordinance CH 160 Chronic Problem Properties, decease This ordinance was worked on through a Town Council Workshop on 1/10/13, sales and re-submitted before the Council on 1/17/13. Additional discussion ensued and amendments were made, no rx and a final draft was approved by the Council. This ordinance will allow the police department to engage the landlord or property owner in problems in the properties they own. It allows the dialogue to start early, and leaves adequate time for them to be heard and address the situation before being assessed costs. This is a great win for the residents of Barnstable in helping them to take back their neighborhoods, and improve their quality of life.

The Town Council voted and approved the proposed amendment to existing Ordinance CH 59 Comprehensive Occupancy, This ordinance changes the age of the “Occupant” from 22 down to 18. This will help to address the properties which are over-crowded with 18 – 21 year olds, who have entered into a lease agreement, but is not considered over crowded because before they were not a “legal occupant.”  This will go a long way to minimize the over-crowded rental properties that have disrupted our neighborhoods for a long time.

The remaining ordinance proposals are scheduled for a workshop on 2/14/13, and will be resubmitted for Public Hearing before the Council on 2/21/13. These ordinances are:

CH133 (Existing) – Noise Ordinance proposed change which will add the property owner/landlord accountable for chronic noise violations

CH170 (Existing) – Rental code proposal to increase the fine for violations from $100 to $300.

CH 54 (NEW) Property Maintenance – setting minimum standards for properties that are detrimental and devaluing our neighborhoods;

A big thanks to all of the Greater Hyannis residents who started this message and process through the Voices of the Village, and who worked hard on helping us be successful in getting these two passed.  Please continue your support as we work to get the remaining ones through the process and approved.

Laura Cronin

 
The Hyannis Town Council will conmtinue public comment on the proposed VoV Landlords, viagra Rentals, and Regulations ordinances during the Town Council Meeting on January
This letter was sent to the “Letters to the Editor” column of the Barnstable Patriot and Enterprise.

Date: 11/7/12

While we are disappointed with the recent delay of the Town Council workshop on some proposed ordinance changes and additions which the GHCA Voices of the Village Task Force – Landlords-Rentals & Regulations have been working on, troche  we are busy using this time to continue to reach out to residents and others to educate and answer questions related to the proposals. We’re inviting opponents into the dialogue so we can gain a better understanding of what their issues and concerns are, and hopefully come up with ideas we can adapt to make these work.

I also want to take this opportunity to clarify some facts and misconceptions about the proposals.

The proposal to existing Ch59 Comprehensive Occupancy is only proposing a change in the “legal occupant” age from 22 down to 18. At 22, we have the reality of having 18 -21 year olds enter into a rental agreement, and live in a potential overcrowded house, by which today they are not considered in the number of legal occupants.

Note: The change to remove the number of vehicle clause from Ch59 Comprehensive Occupancy is not our task force proposal, but a legal department directive to remove it from the rental code ordinance.

The proposal to existing Ch170 Rental Code is proposing we change the violation penalty from $100 up to $300; which is the maximum allowed penalty under MA General Law.

The proposal to existing CH133 Noise Ordinance proposes to add the property owner into the penalty assessment if the property is identified as a having a documented chronic noise problem. By including the property owner in the fines, we have closed the gap where transient tenants “wait out” the fine process, and put the burden on property owners to have accountability for who they rent to. If the property owner is in the process of actively addressing the tenant(s), and/or demonstrating they are working with neighbors and police to correct the situation, they will not continue to be assessed. Some opponents say this will infringe on a person’s individual rights, but currently the noise ordinance is already in effect and perpetrators are cited when they violate the ordinance;  however, they are typically thrown out of court or wait it out until their lease ends never to be seen again, and a new tenant comes in and repeats the nuisance cycle. There is no incentive to curtail the repeated documented behavior or for the owner to take responsibility on who they place in our neighborhoods.

The New CH 160 – Chronic Problem Properties proposes to define a coherent method of addressing the adverse effects on the health, safety, welfare, and quality of life of residents arising from properties where illegal activity occurs on a regular basis.  Illegal activity is the key word. Some opponents claim that if their dog knocks over their neighbor’s trash can they will be fined on each occurrence. In reality, unless knocking over your neighbor’s trash can is a criminal activity in their village, the owner would not be fined.  The perception is that it would target specific groups or neighborhoods, and the honest answer is yes, but not negatively; we see this as a support line for the good, law-abiding residents in our Town who live with this activity going on around them every single day, and who want this repeated illegal activity element gone from their neighborhoods. If we can stop one, we’ve helped hundreds. Again, if the property owner is actively working with police and the courts to correct this situation, they would not continue to be assessed.

The New CH 54 – Building Property Maintenance – is to address nuisances, such as deteriorated structures, vacant buildings, etc. which cause and contribute to blight within neighborhoods and commercial areas,  which adversely affect the value of adjacent and surrounding property and impair the health, safety and general welfare of the inhabitants of the town. Despite what some opponents think currently, there is nothing on the books that we can enforce on abandoned or neglected property owners to bring it up to minimal accepted standards.  Boarded up windows and over growth above the windows continue to thrive in our neighborhoods,  devaluing surrounding properties, and creating a potential risk to the neighbors living there. We have a growing list of properties which all the villages have identified, where nothing can be done. Each one has been brought up to our regulatory inspectors, but they were found they are not in violation of current ordinances. Even using the BIRST team is fruitless, as there is no immediate threat to the public because the doors are boarded up, and no one “can access it.”  Tell that to the neighbors who have to keep their kids inside because vermin and other critters living in the over growth must cross through their property to get there; or the risk of having kids or others, find a way inside the premises. We shouldn’t allow owners of neglected or abandoned properties to let their properties deteriorate at the expense of quality of life of others.  One look at the property across from the Elementary School on Bearses Way says it all.

We have worked hard to reach out to all of the villages, understand what their needs are, and we’ll continue to do so. We hope we can work together in addressing the issues or concerns of opponents, and are open to discuss and adapt the proposals with suggestions. If anyone is interested in meeting with us, they can contact me at GreatHyannis@aol.com .

I would like to thank our GHCA Task Force members and the Town Staff who worked diligently on this project for the past 18 months, and everyone else who has been supporting us along the way. I am asking for their continued support and to come to the Dec 6th council meeting to have the Councilors, and the public, hear their voices. Remember, it started with a question… how can we improve Hyannis…take back our village, our neighborhood, and Town? The Voices of The Villages are strong, and we want to do whatever it takes to make all of Barnstable a great place to live.

Sincerely,

Laura Cronin, GHCA VOV LRR Task Force

Hyannis, MA
Greater Hyannis Civic Association Board Meeting Report – January 8, hospital
2013

The following topics were discussed at the January Board of Directors Meeting.

Richard Elrick and Allyson Alessi joined is from R.E.C to give a presentation about “Pay as You Throw.” (PAYT) The Hyannis contract with SEMASS expires in 2014 and the rate will probably go up, so it is an appropriate time to look into other waste reduction programs.  Curbside and Transfer Station PAYT has been tested and used by other communities in MA and has proven to be cost-effective and efficient.  Users will pay according to the amount of solid waste they dispose of but recycled trash will be free.  The goal is reduce the amount of solid waste and also increase recycling. There are various models, and we have not decided on which we might use as yet (purchase special disposal bags, stickers, etc.)  There would be a fixed, annual cost plus a variable cost paid for either bag or sticker.  The total cost to citizens will be less than the present model, plus the Town will have access to Mass DEP grants and funding. Note that citizens can opt-out of this program if they can provide trash removal and recycling with a private hauler.  Several private haulers will be asked to bid on this town-wide program.

The proposed VoV Landlords, Rentals, and Regulations ordinances will be reviewed and worked upon by the Town Councilors on January 10 to implement the suggestions made during the open meeting in December.  This is not a meeting for open comment, but members of the GHCA and others are invited to sit in.  The final ordinances will be reviewed and voted on during the January 17 Town Councilors’ meeting.

Membership – the Board will spend considerable time during the February 12th Board meeting to discuss how to increase membership.  So far we have 153 household names, 35% of which have not paid their current dues.  We would like to increase paying membership to 200 households.  We will be brainstorming how to increase membership, the benefit of being a member, how to get local businesses involved in membership, and other ideas.  All members of GHCA are encouraged to attend the February Board meeting and give input to this very vital topic.

The GHCA is having its next General Meeting in April, open to all members (and public), to meet your councilors at the Town Hall Councilors’ room as before,  but in a more relaxed, informal set-up.  More details will follow.

The GHCA Annual meeting is held in May, we are shooting for Tues. May 21 once again at the Hyannis Yacht Club.  We will hold elections and update members on the past year, and on up-coming 2014 events.  We are also aiming for a guest speaker.  Watch the web site for more details.
The Board will spend considerable time at the February 12th Board meeting discussing how to increase GHCA membership. We will be brainstorming how to increase membership, buy viagra site the benefit of being a member, check how to get local businesses involved in membership, and other ideas.  All members of GHCA are encouraged to attend the February Board meeting and give input to this very vital topic.
The Board will spend considerable time at the February 12th Board meeting discussing how to increase GHCA membership. We will be brainstorming how to increase membership, store the benefit of being a member, seek how to get local businesses involved in membership, and other ideas.  All members of GHCA are encouraged to attend the February Board meeting and give input to this very vital topic.
rental picture

The Town Council voted and approved the New VoV LRR Ordinance CH 160 Chronic Problem Properties, diagnosis This ordinance was worked on through a Town Council Workshop on 1/10/13, diagnosis and re-submitted before the Council on 1/17/13. Additional discussion ensued and amendments were made, and a final draft was approved by the Council. This ordinance will allow the police department to engage the landlord or property owner in problems in the properties they own. It allows the dialogue to start early, and leaves adequate time for them to be heard and address the situation before being assessed costs. This is a great win for the residents of Barnstable in helping them to take back their neighborhoods, and improve their quality of life.

The Town Council voted and approved the proposed amendment to existing Ordinance CH 59 Comprehensive Occupancy, This ordinance changes the age of the “Occupant” from 22 down to 18. This will help to address the properties which are over-crowded with 18 – 21 year olds, who have entered into a lease agreement, but is not considered over crowded because before they were not a “legal occupant.”  This will go a long way to minimize the over-crowded rental properties that have disrupted our neighborhoods for a long time.

The remaining ordinance proposals are scheduled for a workshop on 2/14/13, and will be resubmitted for Public Hearing before the Council on 2/21/13. These ordinances are:

CH133 (Existing) – Noise Ordinance proposed change which will add the property owner/landlord accountable for chronic noise violations

CH170 (Existing) – Rental code proposal to increase the fine for violations from $100 to $300.

CH 54 (NEW) Property Maintenance – setting minimum standards for properties that are detrimental and devaluing our neighborhoods;

A big thanks to all of the Greater Hyannis residents who started this message and process through the Voices of the Village, and who worked hard on helping us be successful in getting these two passed.  Please continue your support as we work to get the remaining ones through the process and approved.

Laura Cronin

 
rental picture

The Town Council voted and approved the New VoV LRR Ordinance CH 160 Chronic Problem Properties, decease This ordinance was worked on through a Town Council Workshop on 1/10/13, sales and re-submitted before the Council on 1/17/13. Additional discussion ensued and amendments were made, no rx and a final draft was approved by the Council. This ordinance will allow the police department to engage the landlord or property owner in problems in the properties they own. It allows the dialogue to start early, and leaves adequate time for them to be heard and address the situation before being assessed costs. This is a great win for the residents of Barnstable in helping them to take back their neighborhoods, and improve their quality of life.

The Town Council voted and approved the proposed amendment to existing Ordinance CH 59 Comprehensive Occupancy, This ordinance changes the age of the “Occupant” from 22 down to 18. This will help to address the properties which are over-crowded with 18 – 21 year olds, who have entered into a lease agreement, but is not considered over crowded because before they were not a “legal occupant.”  This will go a long way to minimize the over-crowded rental properties that have disrupted our neighborhoods for a long time.

The remaining ordinance proposals are scheduled for a workshop on 2/14/13, and will be resubmitted for Public Hearing before the Council on 2/21/13. These ordinances are:

CH133 (Existing) – Noise Ordinance proposed change which will add the property owner/landlord accountable for chronic noise violations

CH170 (Existing) – Rental code proposal to increase the fine for violations from $100 to $300.

CH 54 (NEW) Property Maintenance – setting minimum standards for properties that are detrimental and devaluing our neighborhoods;

A big thanks to all of the Greater Hyannis residents who started this message and process through the Voices of the Village, and who worked hard on helping us be successful in getting these two passed.  Please continue your support as we work to get the remaining ones through the process and approved.

Laura Cronin

 
The remaining Landlord, look Rentals, no rx and Regulations ordinance proposals  which were not approved on January 17 are scheduled for a workshop on 2/14/13, and will be resubmitted for Public Hearing before the Council on 2/21/13.
The Hyannis Town Council will conmtinue public comment on the proposed VoV Landlords, viagra Rentals, and Regulations ordinances during the Town Council Meeting on January
This letter was sent to the “Letters to the Editor” column of the Barnstable Patriot and Enterprise.

Date: 11/7/12

While we are disappointed with the recent delay of the Town Council workshop on some proposed ordinance changes and additions which the GHCA Voices of the Village Task Force – Landlords-Rentals & Regulations have been working on, troche  we are busy using this time to continue to reach out to residents and others to educate and answer questions related to the proposals. We’re inviting opponents into the dialogue so we can gain a better understanding of what their issues and concerns are, and hopefully come up with ideas we can adapt to make these work.

I also want to take this opportunity to clarify some facts and misconceptions about the proposals.

The proposal to existing Ch59 Comprehensive Occupancy is only proposing a change in the “legal occupant” age from 22 down to 18. At 22, we have the reality of having 18 -21 year olds enter into a rental agreement, and live in a potential overcrowded house, by which today they are not considered in the number of legal occupants.

Note: The change to remove the number of vehicle clause from Ch59 Comprehensive Occupancy is not our task force proposal, but a legal department directive to remove it from the rental code ordinance.

The proposal to existing Ch170 Rental Code is proposing we change the violation penalty from $100 up to $300; which is the maximum allowed penalty under MA General Law.

The proposal to existing CH133 Noise Ordinance proposes to add the property owner into the penalty assessment if the property is identified as a having a documented chronic noise problem. By including the property owner in the fines, we have closed the gap where transient tenants “wait out” the fine process, and put the burden on property owners to have accountability for who they rent to. If the property owner is in the process of actively addressing the tenant(s), and/or demonstrating they are working with neighbors and police to correct the situation, they will not continue to be assessed. Some opponents say this will infringe on a person’s individual rights, but currently the noise ordinance is already in effect and perpetrators are cited when they violate the ordinance;  however, they are typically thrown out of court or wait it out until their lease ends never to be seen again, and a new tenant comes in and repeats the nuisance cycle. There is no incentive to curtail the repeated documented behavior or for the owner to take responsibility on who they place in our neighborhoods.

The New CH 160 – Chronic Problem Properties proposes to define a coherent method of addressing the adverse effects on the health, safety, welfare, and quality of life of residents arising from properties where illegal activity occurs on a regular basis.  Illegal activity is the key word. Some opponents claim that if their dog knocks over their neighbor’s trash can they will be fined on each occurrence. In reality, unless knocking over your neighbor’s trash can is a criminal activity in their village, the owner would not be fined.  The perception is that it would target specific groups or neighborhoods, and the honest answer is yes, but not negatively; we see this as a support line for the good, law-abiding residents in our Town who live with this activity going on around them every single day, and who want this repeated illegal activity element gone from their neighborhoods. If we can stop one, we’ve helped hundreds. Again, if the property owner is actively working with police and the courts to correct this situation, they would not continue to be assessed.

The New CH 54 – Building Property Maintenance – is to address nuisances, such as deteriorated structures, vacant buildings, etc. which cause and contribute to blight within neighborhoods and commercial areas,  which adversely affect the value of adjacent and surrounding property and impair the health, safety and general welfare of the inhabitants of the town. Despite what some opponents think currently, there is nothing on the books that we can enforce on abandoned or neglected property owners to bring it up to minimal accepted standards.  Boarded up windows and over growth above the windows continue to thrive in our neighborhoods,  devaluing surrounding properties, and creating a potential risk to the neighbors living there. We have a growing list of properties which all the villages have identified, where nothing can be done. Each one has been brought up to our regulatory inspectors, but they were found they are not in violation of current ordinances. Even using the BIRST team is fruitless, as there is no immediate threat to the public because the doors are boarded up, and no one “can access it.”  Tell that to the neighbors who have to keep their kids inside because vermin and other critters living in the over growth must cross through their property to get there; or the risk of having kids or others, find a way inside the premises. We shouldn’t allow owners of neglected or abandoned properties to let their properties deteriorate at the expense of quality of life of others.  One look at the property across from the Elementary School on Bearses Way says it all.

We have worked hard to reach out to all of the villages, understand what their needs are, and we’ll continue to do so. We hope we can work together in addressing the issues or concerns of opponents, and are open to discuss and adapt the proposals with suggestions. If anyone is interested in meeting with us, they can contact me at GreatHyannis@aol.com .

I would like to thank our GHCA Task Force members and the Town Staff who worked diligently on this project for the past 18 months, and everyone else who has been supporting us along the way. I am asking for their continued support and to come to the Dec 6th council meeting to have the Councilors, and the public, hear their voices. Remember, it started with a question… how can we improve Hyannis…take back our village, our neighborhood, and Town? The Voices of The Villages are strong, and we want to do whatever it takes to make all of Barnstable a great place to live.

Sincerely,

Laura Cronin, GHCA VOV LRR Task Force

Hyannis, MA
Greater Hyannis Civic Association Board Meeting Report – January 8, hospital
2013

The following topics were discussed at the January Board of Directors Meeting.

Richard Elrick and Allyson Alessi joined is from R.E.C to give a presentation about “Pay as You Throw.” (PAYT) The Hyannis contract with SEMASS expires in 2014 and the rate will probably go up, so it is an appropriate time to look into other waste reduction programs.  Curbside and Transfer Station PAYT has been tested and used by other communities in MA and has proven to be cost-effective and efficient.  Users will pay according to the amount of solid waste they dispose of but recycled trash will be free.  The goal is reduce the amount of solid waste and also increase recycling. There are various models, and we have not decided on which we might use as yet (purchase special disposal bags, stickers, etc.)  There would be a fixed, annual cost plus a variable cost paid for either bag or sticker.  The total cost to citizens will be less than the present model, plus the Town will have access to Mass DEP grants and funding. Note that citizens can opt-out of this program if they can provide trash removal and recycling with a private hauler.  Several private haulers will be asked to bid on this town-wide program.

The proposed VoV Landlords, Rentals, and Regulations ordinances will be reviewed and worked upon by the Town Councilors on January 10 to implement the suggestions made during the open meeting in December.  This is not a meeting for open comment, but members of the GHCA and others are invited to sit in.  The final ordinances will be reviewed and voted on during the January 17 Town Councilors’ meeting.

Membership – the Board will spend considerable time during the February 12th Board meeting to discuss how to increase membership.  So far we have 153 household names, 35% of which have not paid their current dues.  We would like to increase paying membership to 200 households.  We will be brainstorming how to increase membership, the benefit of being a member, how to get local businesses involved in membership, and other ideas.  All members of GHCA are encouraged to attend the February Board meeting and give input to this very vital topic.

The GHCA is having its next General Meeting in April, open to all members (and public), to meet your councilors at the Town Hall Councilors’ room as before,  but in a more relaxed, informal set-up.  More details will follow.

The GHCA Annual meeting is held in May, we are shooting for Tues. May 21 once again at the Hyannis Yacht Club.  We will hold elections and update members on the past year, and on up-coming 2014 events.  We are also aiming for a guest speaker.  Watch the web site for more details.
The Board will spend considerable time at the February 12th Board meeting discussing how to increase GHCA membership. We will be brainstorming how to increase membership, buy viagra site the benefit of being a member, check how to get local businesses involved in membership, and other ideas.  All members of GHCA are encouraged to attend the February Board meeting and give input to this very vital topic.
The Board will spend considerable time at the February 12th Board meeting discussing how to increase GHCA membership. We will be brainstorming how to increase membership, store the benefit of being a member, seek how to get local businesses involved in membership, and other ideas.  All members of GHCA are encouraged to attend the February Board meeting and give input to this very vital topic.
rental picture

The Town Council voted and approved the New VoV LRR Ordinance CH 160 Chronic Problem Properties, diagnosis This ordinance was worked on through a Town Council Workshop on 1/10/13, diagnosis and re-submitted before the Council on 1/17/13. Additional discussion ensued and amendments were made, and a final draft was approved by the Council. This ordinance will allow the police department to engage the landlord or property owner in problems in the properties they own. It allows the dialogue to start early, and leaves adequate time for them to be heard and address the situation before being assessed costs. This is a great win for the residents of Barnstable in helping them to take back their neighborhoods, and improve their quality of life.

The Town Council voted and approved the proposed amendment to existing Ordinance CH 59 Comprehensive Occupancy, This ordinance changes the age of the “Occupant” from 22 down to 18. This will help to address the properties which are over-crowded with 18 – 21 year olds, who have entered into a lease agreement, but is not considered over crowded because before they were not a “legal occupant.”  This will go a long way to minimize the over-crowded rental properties that have disrupted our neighborhoods for a long time.

The remaining ordinance proposals are scheduled for a workshop on 2/14/13, and will be resubmitted for Public Hearing before the Council on 2/21/13. These ordinances are:

CH133 (Existing) – Noise Ordinance proposed change which will add the property owner/landlord accountable for chronic noise violations

CH170 (Existing) – Rental code proposal to increase the fine for violations from $100 to $300.

CH 54 (NEW) Property Maintenance – setting minimum standards for properties that are detrimental and devaluing our neighborhoods;

A big thanks to all of the Greater Hyannis residents who started this message and process through the Voices of the Village, and who worked hard on helping us be successful in getting these two passed.  Please continue your support as we work to get the remaining ones through the process and approved.

Laura Cronin

 
rental picture

The Town Council voted and approved the New VoV LRR Ordinance CH 160 Chronic Problem Properties, decease This ordinance was worked on through a Town Council Workshop on 1/10/13, sales and re-submitted before the Council on 1/17/13. Additional discussion ensued and amendments were made, no rx and a final draft was approved by the Council. This ordinance will allow the police department to engage the landlord or property owner in problems in the properties they own. It allows the dialogue to start early, and leaves adequate time for them to be heard and address the situation before being assessed costs. This is a great win for the residents of Barnstable in helping them to take back their neighborhoods, and improve their quality of life.

The Town Council voted and approved the proposed amendment to existing Ordinance CH 59 Comprehensive Occupancy, This ordinance changes the age of the “Occupant” from 22 down to 18. This will help to address the properties which are over-crowded with 18 – 21 year olds, who have entered into a lease agreement, but is not considered over crowded because before they were not a “legal occupant.”  This will go a long way to minimize the over-crowded rental properties that have disrupted our neighborhoods for a long time.

The remaining ordinance proposals are scheduled for a workshop on 2/14/13, and will be resubmitted for Public Hearing before the Council on 2/21/13. These ordinances are:

CH133 (Existing) – Noise Ordinance proposed change which will add the property owner/landlord accountable for chronic noise violations

CH170 (Existing) – Rental code proposal to increase the fine for violations from $100 to $300.

CH 54 (NEW) Property Maintenance – setting minimum standards for properties that are detrimental and devaluing our neighborhoods;

A big thanks to all of the Greater Hyannis residents who started this message and process through the Voices of the Village, and who worked hard on helping us be successful in getting these two passed.  Please continue your support as we work to get the remaining ones through the process and approved.

Laura Cronin

 
The remaining Landlord, look Rentals, no rx and Regulations ordinance proposals  which were not approved on January 17 are scheduled for a workshop on 2/14/13, and will be resubmitted for Public Hearing before the Council on 2/21/13.
The GHCA kids’ bike and carriage parade has become an annual event that attracts some of the cutest and most creative kids in greater Hyannis.   The entries are judged on the Village Green on July 4th, store and then all kids and their parents are invited to join in the July 4th parade.  This year’s event included entries from over 25 children, purchase and 10 prizes were awarded which included a t-shirt plus other fun items. Take a look at some of this year’s entries.

 

The VoV Landlords, generic Rentals, information pills and Regulations (LRR) task force had a productive and interactive meeting with the Town Council on December 6th.  It was decided to meet in smaller groups with the Councilors, other Barnstable Civic Associations, and interested cvitizens to address concerns raised at the December 6th meeting by re-working a few of the proposed ordinances, with the goal of being ready for a vote at the Town Council meeting on January 17th.

These sessions will be open to the public and the GHCA LRR Task Force is looking for the public’s input regarding recommendations for changes in the language of the ordinances. Watch this web site for the dates for the open meeting workshops.  Additionally, you can send recommended changes directly to the GHCA LRR task force via email at GreatHyannis@aol.com

A copy of the ordinances is posted on this web site under Voices of the Village -> Task Forces -> Landlords, Rentals, and Regulations.

 
The VoV Landlords, generic Rentals, information pills and Regulations (LRR) task force had a productive and interactive meeting with the Town Council on December 6th.  It was decided to meet in smaller groups with the Councilors, other Barnstable Civic Associations, and interested cvitizens to address concerns raised at the December 6th meeting by re-working a few of the proposed ordinances, with the goal of being ready for a vote at the Town Council meeting on January 17th.

These sessions will be open to the public and the GHCA LRR Task Force is looking for the public’s input regarding recommendations for changes in the language of the ordinances. Watch this web site for the dates for the open meeting workshops.  Additionally, you can send recommended changes directly to the GHCA LRR task force via email at GreatHyannis@aol.com

A copy of the ordinances is posted on this web site under Voices of the Village -> Task Forces -> Landlords, Rentals, and Regulations.

 
rental picture

The Town Council voted and approved the New VoV LRR Ordinance CH 160 Chronic Problem Properties, treatment This ordinance was worked on through a Town Council Workshop on 1/10/13, treatment and re-submitted before the Council on 1/17/13. Additional discussion ensued and amendments were made, buy viagra and a final draft was approved by the Council. This ordinance will allow the police department to engage the landlord or property owner in problems in the properties they own. It allows the dialogue to start early, and leaves adequate time for them to be heard and address the situation before being assessed costs. This is a great win for the residents of Barnstable in helping them to take back their neighborhoods, and improve their quality of life.

The Town Council voted and approved the proposed amendment to existing Ordinance CH 59 Comprehensive Occupancy, This ordinance changes the age of the “Occupant” from 22 down to 18. This will help to address the properties which are over-crowded with 18 – 21 year olds, who have entered into a lease agreement, but is not considered over crowded because before they were not a “legal occupant.”  This will go a long way to minimize the over-crowded rental properties that have disrupted our neighborhoods for a long time.

The remaining ordinance proposals are scheduled for a workshop on 2/14/13, and will be resubmitted for Public Hearing before the Council on 2/21/13. These ordinances are:

CH133 (Existing) – Noise Ordinance proposed change which will add the property owner/landlord accountable for chronic noise violations

CH170 (Existing) – Rental code proposal to increase the fine for violations from $100 to $300.

CH 54 (NEW) Property Maintenance – setting minimum standards for properties that are detrimental and devaluing our neighborhoods;

A big thanks to all of the Greater Hyannis residents who started this message and process through the Voices of the Village, and who worked hard on helping us be successful in getting these two passed.  Please continue your support as we work to get the remaining ones through the process and approved.

Laura Cronin

 
The VoV Landlords, generic Rentals, information pills and Regulations (LRR) task force had a productive and interactive meeting with the Town Council on December 6th.  It was decided to meet in smaller groups with the Councilors, other Barnstable Civic Associations, and interested cvitizens to address concerns raised at the December 6th meeting by re-working a few of the proposed ordinances, with the goal of being ready for a vote at the Town Council meeting on January 17th.

These sessions will be open to the public and the GHCA LRR Task Force is looking for the public’s input regarding recommendations for changes in the language of the ordinances. Watch this web site for the dates for the open meeting workshops.  Additionally, you can send recommended changes directly to the GHCA LRR task force via email at GreatHyannis@aol.com

A copy of the ordinances is posted on this web site under Voices of the Village -> Task Forces -> Landlords, Rentals, and Regulations.

 
rental picture

The Town Council voted and approved the New VoV LRR Ordinance CH 160 Chronic Problem Properties, treatment This ordinance was worked on through a Town Council Workshop on 1/10/13, treatment and re-submitted before the Council on 1/17/13. Additional discussion ensued and amendments were made, buy viagra and a final draft was approved by the Council. This ordinance will allow the police department to engage the landlord or property owner in problems in the properties they own. It allows the dialogue to start early, and leaves adequate time for them to be heard and address the situation before being assessed costs. This is a great win for the residents of Barnstable in helping them to take back their neighborhoods, and improve their quality of life.

The Town Council voted and approved the proposed amendment to existing Ordinance CH 59 Comprehensive Occupancy, This ordinance changes the age of the “Occupant” from 22 down to 18. This will help to address the properties which are over-crowded with 18 – 21 year olds, who have entered into a lease agreement, but is not considered over crowded because before they were not a “legal occupant.”  This will go a long way to minimize the over-crowded rental properties that have disrupted our neighborhoods for a long time.

The remaining ordinance proposals are scheduled for a workshop on 2/14/13, and will be resubmitted for Public Hearing before the Council on 2/21/13. These ordinances are:

CH133 (Existing) – Noise Ordinance proposed change which will add the property owner/landlord accountable for chronic noise violations

CH170 (Existing) – Rental code proposal to increase the fine for violations from $100 to $300.

CH 54 (NEW) Property Maintenance – setting minimum standards for properties that are detrimental and devaluing our neighborhoods;

A big thanks to all of the Greater Hyannis residents who started this message and process through the Voices of the Village, and who worked hard on helping us be successful in getting these two passed.  Please continue your support as we work to get the remaining ones through the process and approved.

Laura Cronin

 
rental picture

The Town Council voted and approved the New VoV LRR Ordinance CH 160 Chronic Problem Properties, pharm This ordinance was worked on through a Town Council Workshop on 1/10/13, and re-submitted before the Council on 1/17/13. Additional discussion ensued and amendments were made, and a final draft was approved by the Council. This ordinance will allow the police department to engage the landlord or property owner in problems in the properties they own. It allows the dialogue to start early, and leaves adequate time for them to be heard and address the situation before being assessed costs. This is a great win for the residents of Barnstable in helping them to take back their neighborhoods, and improve their quality of life.

The Town Council voted and approved the proposed amendment to existing Ordinance CH 59 Comprehensive Occupancy, This ordinance changes the age of the “Occupant” from 22 down to 18. This will help to address the properties which are over-crowded with 18 – 21 year olds, who have entered into a lease agreement, but is not considered over crowded because before they were not a “legal occupant.”  This will go a long way to minimize the over-crowded rental properties that have disrupted our neighborhoods for a long time.

The remaining ordinance proposals are scheduled for a workshop on 2/14/13, and will be resubmitted for Public Hearing before the Council on 2/21/13. These ordinances are:

CH133 (Existing) – Noise Ordinance proposed change which will add the property owner/landlord accountable for chronic noise violations

CH170 (Existing) – Rental code proposal to increase the fine for violations from $100 to $300.

CH 54 (NEW) Property Maintenance – setting minimum standards for properties that are detrimental and devaluing our neighborhoods;

A copy of the ordinances is posted on this web site under Voices of the Village -> Task Forces -> Landlords, Rentals, and Regulations.

A big thanks to all of the Greater Hyannis residents who started this message and process through the Voices of the Village, and who worked hard on helping us be successful in getting these two passed.  Please continue your support as we work to get the remaining ones through the process and approved.

Laura Cronin

 
The VoV Landlords, generic Rentals, information pills and Regulations (LRR) task force had a productive and interactive meeting with the Town Council on December 6th.  It was decided to meet in smaller groups with the Councilors, other Barnstable Civic Associations, and interested cvitizens to address concerns raised at the December 6th meeting by re-working a few of the proposed ordinances, with the goal of being ready for a vote at the Town Council meeting on January 17th.

These sessions will be open to the public and the GHCA LRR Task Force is looking for the public’s input regarding recommendations for changes in the language of the ordinances. Watch this web site for the dates for the open meeting workshops.  Additionally, you can send recommended changes directly to the GHCA LRR task force via email at GreatHyannis@aol.com

A copy of the ordinances is posted on this web site under Voices of the Village -> Task Forces -> Landlords, Rentals, and Regulations.

 
rental picture

The Town Council voted and approved the New VoV LRR Ordinance CH 160 Chronic Problem Properties, treatment This ordinance was worked on through a Town Council Workshop on 1/10/13, treatment and re-submitted before the Council on 1/17/13. Additional discussion ensued and amendments were made, buy viagra and a final draft was approved by the Council. This ordinance will allow the police department to engage the landlord or property owner in problems in the properties they own. It allows the dialogue to start early, and leaves adequate time for them to be heard and address the situation before being assessed costs. This is a great win for the residents of Barnstable in helping them to take back their neighborhoods, and improve their quality of life.

The Town Council voted and approved the proposed amendment to existing Ordinance CH 59 Comprehensive Occupancy, This ordinance changes the age of the “Occupant” from 22 down to 18. This will help to address the properties which are over-crowded with 18 – 21 year olds, who have entered into a lease agreement, but is not considered over crowded because before they were not a “legal occupant.”  This will go a long way to minimize the over-crowded rental properties that have disrupted our neighborhoods for a long time.

The remaining ordinance proposals are scheduled for a workshop on 2/14/13, and will be resubmitted for Public Hearing before the Council on 2/21/13. These ordinances are:

CH133 (Existing) – Noise Ordinance proposed change which will add the property owner/landlord accountable for chronic noise violations

CH170 (Existing) – Rental code proposal to increase the fine for violations from $100 to $300.

CH 54 (NEW) Property Maintenance – setting minimum standards for properties that are detrimental and devaluing our neighborhoods;

A big thanks to all of the Greater Hyannis residents who started this message and process through the Voices of the Village, and who worked hard on helping us be successful in getting these two passed.  Please continue your support as we work to get the remaining ones through the process and approved.

Laura Cronin

 
rental picture

The Town Council voted and approved the New VoV LRR Ordinance CH 160 Chronic Problem Properties, pharm This ordinance was worked on through a Town Council Workshop on 1/10/13, and re-submitted before the Council on 1/17/13. Additional discussion ensued and amendments were made, and a final draft was approved by the Council. This ordinance will allow the police department to engage the landlord or property owner in problems in the properties they own. It allows the dialogue to start early, and leaves adequate time for them to be heard and address the situation before being assessed costs. This is a great win for the residents of Barnstable in helping them to take back their neighborhoods, and improve their quality of life.

The Town Council voted and approved the proposed amendment to existing Ordinance CH 59 Comprehensive Occupancy, This ordinance changes the age of the “Occupant” from 22 down to 18. This will help to address the properties which are over-crowded with 18 – 21 year olds, who have entered into a lease agreement, but is not considered over crowded because before they were not a “legal occupant.”  This will go a long way to minimize the over-crowded rental properties that have disrupted our neighborhoods for a long time.

The remaining ordinance proposals are scheduled for a workshop on 2/14/13, and will be resubmitted for Public Hearing before the Council on 2/21/13. These ordinances are:

CH133 (Existing) – Noise Ordinance proposed change which will add the property owner/landlord accountable for chronic noise violations

CH170 (Existing) – Rental code proposal to increase the fine for violations from $100 to $300.

CH 54 (NEW) Property Maintenance – setting minimum standards for properties that are detrimental and devaluing our neighborhoods;

A copy of the ordinances is posted on this web site under Voices of the Village -> Task Forces -> Landlords, Rentals, and Regulations.

A big thanks to all of the Greater Hyannis residents who started this message and process through the Voices of the Village, and who worked hard on helping us be successful in getting these two passed.  Please continue your support as we work to get the remaining ones through the process and approved.

Laura Cronin

 
Greater Hyannis Civic Association Board Meeting Report – February 12, search case 2013

Only 9 Board members were in attendance, cialis so we did not have a quorum and could not vote on anything.  However, we did have a good discussion on a number of topics.

Membership drive:  We brainstormed ways to increase membership.  Increasing membership is more difficult in Hyannis than in other Villages due to the size and diversity of our many neighborhoods.  Some ideas tossed around were (1) send a mailing to the VoV list which has 300 names on it. (2) Send a mailing to the Hyannis New Comers membership list. (3) Each Board member will bring 5 names and addresses of their neighbors to the next Board meeting, we will cross –check the names with our list and then send a mailing. (4) Pick a neighborhood and do a mailing.  GHCA members are encouraged to come forward with other ideas on how to raise more members.

April general meeting – “A Conversation with the Town Councilors” – will be held on April 17 in the Town Council room at the Town Hall.  Invitations will be sent to the Councilors immediately to hold their calendars.  The set-up of the forum will be more casual this time, and perhaps instead of questions, the Board will float topics in advance and have the Councilors ready to give us an update, which will spur questions and conversation.

Save the date!  The Annual Membership Meeting will be held at the Hyannis Yacht Club on May 21.

It’s time to elect a nominating committee to work on filling empty slots in the Board.  (This action item was tabled until next meeting.)

Chris Clark from the Land and Acquisition Preservation Committee will speak at the April Board Meeting.

Bill Cronin is looking into providing a monthly column to the Barnstable Patriot to keep citizens informed of what we are working on. Paulette Rio will help write the article.